Jainchill & Beckert, LLC

car accidents Archives

Overall, motor vehicle accident numbers were down in 2017

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration recently released the 2017 statistics acquired from its Fatality Analysis Reporting System. It seems that the overall number of fatalities occurring because of motor vehicle accidents across the nation were down by almost 2 percent in 2017 compared to the previous year. However, Connecticut residents should be aware that not all of the news is positive.

Americans drive 107 billion miles each year while distracted

Smartphone ownership in the U.S. stood at 55 percent in 2013, but now more than three in four Americans carry the ubiquitous devices. Road safety experts say that the corresponding surge in distracted driving in Connecticut and around the country is one of the chief reasons that the number of car accidents rose by 12.3 percent from 5.7 million to 6.4 million during the same period. According to a study, drivers in the United States covered 107 billion miles in 2017 while distracted by a cellphone.

Researchers endorse teen driving programs

Thousands of teenagers die around the country each year in motor vehicle accidents, and police investigations often reveal that they were ignoring posted speed limits or staring at cellphone screens when they died. Public information campaigns have done little to deter young drivers from behaving recklessly behind the wheel, but a Baylor University study suggests that supplemental driver's education programs that bring teenagers face-to-face with the consequences of speeding and distraction could succeed in Connecticut and across the U.S. where more conventional approaches have failed.

New auto technologies are increasing distracted driving

Car manufacturers are constantly attempting to improve their information and entertainment products to impress their clients. However, Connecticut residents might be surprised to learn that a study from AAA's Foundation for Traffic Safety reports that these same systems might be contributing to distracted driving and the resulting accidents.

An important message about distracted driving

According to the NHTSA, there were 3,477 deaths attributed to distracted driving in Connecticut and throughout America in 2015. Distracted driving occurs when a driver is doing anything that takes his or her focus from the road. This could include eating while driving, talking with a passenger or changing a radio station. Sending text messages is another dangerous and common way in which drivers can be distracted.

Self-driving technology can make roads safer today

For people in Connecticut and across the United States, autonomous vehicles can seem like an exciting technology for all the possibilities they offer. Not only could they potentially cut down on the daily annoyances of commutes and traffic jams, but self-driving cars could be a major boon for roadway safety. A great deal of writing and reporting on automobiles today is focusing on the potentials of the future development of fully autonomous vehicles.

The NHTSA to discuss drugged driving

Connecticut motorists may be pleased to learn about the steps that the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is taking to stop people who get behind the wheel while under the influence of drugs. In part because of the legalization of marijuana and the rampant opioid use in the United States, there is a urgency to address the increase in drugged driving accidents.

Roundabouts can significantly reduce accident fatalities

Replacing busy intersections with roundabouts could potentially save lives in Connecticut and around the country according to the findings contained in a report. The Minnesota Department of Transportation studied traffic accidents that took place at 144 intersections both before and after traffic lights were replaced by roundabouts, and they found that fatalities plunged by 86 percent when drivers were forced to slow down and all travel in the same direction.

Coexisting with wildlife as days get shorter

Connecticut drivers may have to adjust their driving habits as the days get shorter. Nov. 5 marked the end of Daylight Saving Time, and it comes at a time of year in which animals are mating or looking for food before winter. Deer, bears and other forms of wildlife could be roaming the streets during morning and evening commutes. As a general rule, drivers should reduce their speed during periods when it is harder to see.

Night shifts pose car injury risks

Not everyone who lives in Connecticut works a standard 9:00 to 5:00 job. In fact, many workers find that their schedules frequently change, with many working night shifts. While it is true that there is a need for nighttime workers in certain workplaces and industries, nighttime work has been increasingly associated with health and safety risks.

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Jainchill & Beckert

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Plainville, CT 06062

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